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Summerfun in the Grafenwoehr area

Jul 7, 20180 comments

Karin Stumph

You are really close to Nurnberg, which has a beautiful old city and Castle

Nuremberg is a city in the German state of Bavaria, in the administrative region of Middle Franconia. Situated on the Pegnitz river and the Rhine–Main–Danube Canal, it is located about 170 kilometers (105 miles) north of Munich and is Franconia’s largest city. The population (as of December 2010) is 505,664. The “European Metropolitan Area Nuremberg” has 3.5 million inhabitants.

Nuremberg Castle: the three castles that tower over the city including central burg raves’ castle, with Free Reich’s buildings to the east, the Imperial castle to the west.

Heilig-Geist-Spital. In the center of the city, on the bank of the river Pegnitz, stands the Hospital of the Holy Spirit. Founded in 1332, this is one of the largest hospitals of the middle Ages. Lepers were kept here at some distance from the other patients. It now houses elderly persons and a restaurant.

Hauptmarkt, which provides a picturesque setting and famous market for gingerbread. Nuremberg’s star attraction is the Gothic Schöner Brunnen (Beautiful Fountain) which was erected around 1385 but subsequently replaced with a replica (the original fountain is kept in the Germanisches Nationalmuseum). The unchanged Renaissance bridge Fleischbrücke crosses the Pegnitz nearby.

The following churches are located inside the city walls: St Sebald’s, St. Laurence’s, Frauenkirche (Our Lady’s Church), Saint Clare’s, Saint Martha’s, Saint James the Greater’s, Saint Giles’s, and Saint Elisabeth’s.

Gothic St Lorenz-Kirche (St. Lorenz church, St. Laurence), one of the most important buildings in Nuremberg. The main body was built around 1270-1350.

The church of the former Katharinenkloster is preserved as a ruin, the charterhouse (Kartause) is integrated into the building of the Germanisches Nationalmuseum and the choir of the former Franziskanerkirche is part of a modern building.

  • The Neues Museum Nürnberg is a museum for modern and contemporary art
  • The Walburga Chapel and the Romanesque Doppelkapelle (Chapel with two floors) are part of Nuremberg Castle.
  • The Johannisfriedhof is a medieval cemetery, containing many old graves (Albrecht Dürer, Willibald Pirckheimer, and others). The Rochusfriedhof or the Wöhrder Kirchhof are near the Old Town.
  • The Tiergarten Nürnberg is a zoo stretching over more than 60 hectares (148 acres) in the Nürnberger Reichswald forest.
  • There is also a medieval market just inside the city walls, selling handcrafted goods.
  • The German National Railways Museum (German) (an Anchor Point of ERIH, The European Route of Industrial Heritage) is located in Nuremberg.
  • The Nuremberg Ring (now welded within an iron fence) is said to bring good luck to those that touch it.
  • The Nazi party rally grounds with the documentation-center.

Regensburg is a lovely city too, same as Wurzburg, which is a bit farther out.

Regensburg is a city in Bavaria, Germany, located at the confluence of the Danube and Regen rivers, at the northernmost bend in the Danube. To the east lies the Bavarian Forest. Regensburg is the capital of the Bavarian administrative region Upper Palatinate. The large medieval center of the city is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Notable artists that lived in Würzburg include poet Walther von der Vogelweide (12th and 13th cent.), philosopher Albertus Magnus and painter Mathias Grünewald. Two artists who made a lasting impression were sculptor Tilman Riemenschneider (1460–1531), who was also mayor and participated in the German Peasants’ War, and Balthasar Neumann (1687–1753), Baroque architect and builder of the Würzburg Residence, now a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Its interior was decorated by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo and his son, Domenico. Many of the city’s “100 churches” survived intact with styles ranging from Romanesque (Würzburg Cathedral), Gothic (Marienkapelle), Renaissance (Neubaukirche), Baroque (Stift Haug Kirche) to modern (St Andreas).

Würzburg hosts the Mainfranken Museum, with artifacts from prehistory until modern times, a Museum of the cathedral, galleries for ancient and modern art, and the “Kulturspeicher” from 2002. Notable festivals include the Afrika Festival in May, the Mozartfest, in June/July and the Kiliani Volksfest in mid-July.

Würzburg Residenz: The vast complex on the eastern edge of the town was commissioned by two prince-bishops, the brothers Johann Philipp Franz and Friedrich Karl von Schönborn. Its construction between 1720 and 1744 was supervised by several architects, including Johann Lukas von Hildebrandt and Maximilian von Welsch. Although much of it destroyed during WWII, it has been completely rebuilt as it was before the war. However, it is associated mainly with the name of Balthasar Neumann, the creator of its famous Baroque staircase. Its main sights are:

  • Hofkirche: The church interior is richly decorated with paintings, sculptures and stucco ornaments. The altars were painted by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo.
  • Treppenhaus: The largest fresco in the world adorns the vault of the staircase by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo. For many years the staircase appeared on a Deutschmark bill.
  • Kaisersaal: The centerpiece of the palace, emperor’s chamber which testifies the close relationship between Würzburg and the Holy Roman Empire.
  • Fortress MarienbergThe Fortress Marienberg is the castle on a hill across the Old Main Bridge, overlooking the whole town area as well as the surrounding hills.
  • Würzburg’s Old Main Bridge (Alte Mainbrücke) was built 1473–1543 to replace the destroyed Romanesque bridge from 1133. It was adorned from 1730 on in two phases with well-known statues of saints and famous persons. A similar impressive bridge is the Charles Bridge in Prague.

Among Würzburg’s many notable churches are the Käppele, a small Baroque/Rococo chapel by Balthasar Neumann on a hill opposite to the fortress and the Dom (Würzburg Cathedral). The Baroque Schönborn Chapel, a side-chapel of the cathedral has interior decoration made of (artificial) human bones and skulls. Also in the cathedral are two of Tilman Riemenschneider’s most famous works, the tomb stones of Rudolf II von Scherenberg (1466–1495) and Lorenz von Bibra (1495–1519). Look for replicas of the statues of Adam and Eve by Riemenschneider at the entrance to the Marienkapelle (on the market square). The Neumünster is a Romanesque minster church with a Baroque façade and dome. Among the Baroque churches in the inner city are Stift Haug, St. Michael, St. Stephan and St. Peter.

  • The Julius Spital is a Baroque hospital with a courtyard and a church built by the prince bishop Julius Echter. Its medieval wine cellar, together with those of the Würzburg Residence and the Bürgerspital are one place to taste the Frankenwein. With an area under cultivation of 1.68 square kilometres, the Julius Spital is the second largest winery in Germany.
  • The Haus zum Falken next to the Marienkapelle, with its splendid facade, is an achievement of the Würzburg rococo period and accommodates a tourist office.
  • The Stift Haug was built in the years 1670–1691 and was the first Baroque church in Franconia. It is the most important building of the Italian architect Antonio Petrini.